Anatomy for Emergency Medicine 031: CFN Eye Anatomy Part 2

This is the second of a series of podcasts I’m doing on basic eye anatomy for the CEM FOAMed Network. This is a developing resource which aims to provide a fully mapped college curriculum with FOAMed resources. Be sure and check it out and get the podcast. This podcast went out a while ago on the CFN and I’m just providing it for everyone else who hasn’t got it already.

The single most important resource you need is Ophthobook.com

Part 1

Anatomy for Emergency Medicine 030: CFN Eye Anatomy Part 1

This is the first of a series of podcasts I’m doing on basic eye anatomy for the CEM FOAMed Network. This is a developing resource which aims to provide a fully mapped college curriculum with FOAMed resources. Be sure and check it out and get the podcast. This podcast went out a while ago on the CFN and I’m just providing it for everyone else who hasn’t got it already.

The single most important resource you need is Ophthobook.com

[Direct Download] [8omb]

AFEM Podcast

SMACC Gold Neuroanatomy Talk

Back in March 2014 I had the pleasure of speaking at SMACC Gold in Australia. The whole thing was great fun and I’m sure you’re all aware it’s going to Chicago in May 2015 so be sure to be there. Indeed Registration opens tonight (in the UK at least) so check it out!!!

Every talk from the conference is coming out via the SMACC podcast so make sure you subscribe.

As my talk is so predominantly visual, it really needs the slides for it to make sense so I’ve included the slideset here and put the audio over the slides so you can get the feel of the talk.

Direct Download [SD 41mb]

For people interested in learning some more detailed neuroanatomy I’d strongly recommend headneckbrainspine.com

They’ve done what I’ve always wanted to do and have created scrolling, labelled radiology images that wonderfully demonstrate the anatomy in 3 dimensions. Really invaluable stuff.

Here’s a list of previous neuro related podcasts I’ve done:

And if you’re interested in working where I work as an ultrasound or education fellow then get in touch.

Anatomy for Emergency Medicine 028: Fascia Iliaca Block

Hi Guys, sorry for the big gap in posting.

Life has a way of taking over as you all know.

Direct Download

iTunes subscription

AFEM RSS feed

I’m currently trying to introduce fascia iliaca blocks as part of routine care for patients in our department so i thought a podcast on some of the anatomy wouldn’t go a miss. If you want some light reading on the literature, then I’ve included a big list below.

If you’re more practically orientated then I’d strongly recommend the following:

Ultrasound Podcast: Fem Nv Block

NYSORA: Fascia Iliaca Block.

 

References:

Gray’s Anatomy 41st Edition

1.Godoy Monzón D, Vazquez J, Jauregui JR, Iserson KV. Pain treatment in post-traumatic hip fracture in the elderly: regional block vs. systemic non-steroidal analgesics. Int J Emerg Med. 2010;3(4):321–5.

2.Mouzopoulos G, Vasiliadis G, Lasanianos N, Nikolaras G, Morakis E, Kaminaris M. Fascia iliaca block prophylaxis for hip fracture patients at risk for delirium: a randomized placebo-controlled study. J Orthopaed Traumatol. 2009 Aug 19;10(3):127–33.

3.Høgh A, Dremstrup L, Jensen SS, Lindholt J. Fascia iliaca compartment block performed by junior registrars as a supplement to pre-operative analgesia for patients with hip fracture. Strat Traum Limb Recon. 2008 Sep 2;3(2):65–70.

4.Godoy Monzón D, Iserson KV, Vazquez JA. Single fascia iliaca compartment block for post-hip fracture pain relief. JEM. 2007 Apr;32(3):257–62.

5.NZ Guidelines Group. Acute Management and Immediate Rehabilitation After Hip Fracture Amongst People Aged 65 Years and Over. 2003;:1–40.

6.National Clinical Guideline Centre. The management of hip fracture in adults. 2011;:1–664.

7.SIGN SIGN. Management of hip fracture in older people. 2009 Jun;:1–56.

8.(null) INHFDSG. Irish Hip Fracture Database Preliminary Report 2013. 2014 Mar 4;:1–50.

9.(null) TCOEM. Clinical Standards for Emergency Departments. 2013;:1–16.

10.Beaudoin FL, Haran JP, Liebmann O. A Comparison of Ultrasound-guided Three-in-one Femoral Nerve Block Versus Parenteral Opioids Alone for Analgesia in Emergency Department Patients With Hip Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Academic Emergency Medicine. 2013 Jun 12;20(6):584–91.

11.Elkhodair S, Mortazavi J, Chester A, Pereira M. Single fascia iliaca compartment block for pain relief in patients with fractured neck of femur in the emergency department: a pilot study. Eur J Emerg Med. 2011 Dec;18(6):340–3.

12.Williams R, Saha B. Best evidence topic report. Ultrasound placement of needle in three-in-one nerve block. Emergency Medicine Journal. 2006 May;23(5):401–3.

13.Christos SC, Chiampas G, Offman R, Rifenburg R. Ultrasound-guided three-in-one nerve block for femur fractures. West J Emerg Med. 2010 Sep;11(4):310–3.

14.Fletcher AK, Rigby AS, Heyes FLP. Three-in-one femoral nerve block as analgesia for fractured neck of femur in the emergency department: a randomized, controlled trial. Ann Emerg Med. 2003 Feb 1;41(2):227–33.

15.Beaudoin FL, Nagdev A, Merchant RC, Becker BM. Ultrasound-guided femoral nerve blocks in elderly patients with hip fractures. Am J Emerg Med. 2010 Jan;28(1):76–81.

16.Haines L, Dickman E, Ayvazyan S, Pearl M, Wu S, Rosenblum D, et al. Ultrasound-guided fascia iliaca compartment block for hip fractures in the emergency department. JEM. 2012 Oct;43(4):692–7.

17.Rashid A, Beswick E, Galitzine S, Fitton L. Regional analgesia in the emergency department for hip fractures: survey of current UK practice and its impact on services in a teaching hospital. Emergency Medicine Journal. 2013 Jul 22.

18.Abou-Setta AM, Beaupre LA, Rashiq S, Dryden DM, Hamm MP, Sadowski CA, et al. Comparative effectiveness of pain management interventions for hip fracture: a systematic review. Ann Intern Med. 2011 Aug 16;155(4):234–45.

19.Parker MJ, Griffiths R, Appadu BN. Nerve blocks (subcostal, lateral cutaneous, femoral, triple, psoas) for hip fractures. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. Wiley Online Library; 2002;1.

20.Foss NB, Kristensen BB, Bundgaard M, Bak M, Heiring C, Virkelyst C, et al. Fascia iliaca compartment blockade for acute pain control in hip fracture patients: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Anesthesiology. 2007 Apr;106(4):773–8.

What lies beneath

One of the key things in looking at x-rays is being able to visualise the anatomy – what does each shadow and each area of whiteness represent anatomically. The x-ray is a rough representation of the anatomy lying under the skin.

The image below is a great example of what you’re really looking at when you look at the CXR. The mediastinum on the CXR looks like a fairly boring blob of white, but what secrets it contains!

Thoracic Angio CXR

Click for larger image

Thoracic angio from farm6.staticflickr.com via medical school

And annotated

Normal CXR AP

via Mike Cadogan on GMEP

Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE